Andover Townsman, Andover, MA

News

March 20, 2014

Town election fires up

Oberto, O'Donoghue trade barbs in race for selectman's seat

(Continued)

She explained the FinCom, as it’s known, is an advisory board comprised of nine members who make recommendations to the Board of Selectmen and Town Meeting.

“The Board of Selectmen is a very different body in town,” she said. “I hope Jodi understands the difference between them. We have always urged budget restraint and my fellow board members can corroborate that. Experience counts, at least in my world.”

According to campaign finance reports submitted to Town Clerk Larry Murphy on Monday, that may be true.

Oberto had spent just $37.70 on business cards for the campaign, which she paid to herself. She said she has since purchased 50 lawn signs, most of which she has put up around town. That expense will appear in her final campaign finance report after the election.

O’Donoghue, meanwhile, reported $3,480 in donations and $1,443 in expenses for signs and strapping. The donations include $250 from John Moffitt; $200 each from Linn Anderson, Chris Doherty, Joseph Doherty and Douglas Howe; and $100 each from Michael Boness, Michael Deluca, Jane Gifun, Larry and Nan Larsen, Karl Mentz, Margaret O’Connor, Beibhinn O’Donoghue, son Geoffrey O’Donoghue, Susan Stott, Jon Stumpf and Timothy Sullivan. Her husband, Geoffrey, has donated $500 and she has also made a $500 contribution to her own campaign.

Oberto said she doesn’t like asking people for money.

“(The election) is something I’m taking on and I should handle,” she said.

O’Donoghue said she has been talking with voters at meet-the-candidate functions and has heard loud and clear what the issues are.

“The common theme is that people are concerned about spending, transparency and accountability in the budget process,” she said. “That’s the main theme. There’s a sense that the interests of the taxpayer have been lost in the process.”

As a member of the Board of Selectmen, she said she would push for easing up on the levy limit so that the town spends less each year, which would save taxpayers money.

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