Andover Townsman, Andover, MA

September 12, 2012

All Those Years Ago

Compiled by Susan McKelliget
The Andover Townsman

---- — 100 Years Ago—Sept. 13, 1912

The flower show held in the town hall last Friday and Saturday amply fulfilled all expectations and was a complete success. The exhibits were many and beautiful; the attendance was large; interest was keen, and everyone enjoyed the show.

Archibald Roosevelt, son of ex-President Roosevelt, has entered Phillips Academy and arrived in town on Thursday.

A new candy store, to be called the Andover Candy Kitchen, will be opened shortly on Main Street in the store formerly occupied by J.P. West.

Miss Edna Chapin, business instructor at Punchard School, and her mother, will occupy the house on Summer Street formerly the home of H.H. Remick.

James Christie, Chester Callum and Adam Michelini are among the Andover boys who have entered Phillips Academy this fall.

Miss Ethel Bigney has accepted a position in the Andover Bookstore.



75 Years Ago—Sept. 10, 1937

The special congressional primary to select party standard-bearers for the election two weeks hence will take place throughout the seventh congressional district next Tuesday with Andover’s polls being open, at the town hall only, from noon to 6:30 p.m.

Five persons were hurt, two of them painfully, last night when a Lawrence car crashed into the rear of a car driven by George Keating of Marland Street, Ballardvale, in front the Balmoral Spa. Keating had just stopped at the Spa to make a purchase when the other car struck his car, which in turn broke off an electric light standard in four places and continued on some 100 feet more.

Town Counsel Arthur Sweeney is expected to file an answer in Superior Court next week to a suit for $10,000 filed this week against Chief of Police George A. Dane by a Stoneham man who was occupant of the police car in which then officer Ray Hickey was injured last September. Officer Hickey was returning the man to Andover after having arrested him on a charge of operating under the influence, when a truck cutting out of line in North Reading crashed the police car.



50 Years Ago—Sept. 13, 1962

Andover’s 4,296 independent voters have as much right to vote in the primary next Tuesday as do party members. This large segment of voters—45 percent to be exact—has not lost its right to vote because its members have no party designation.

The police department has been requested to close off Lovejoy Road three times each day, until sidewalks are constructed on that problem street.

A special town meeting on Urban Renewal will be held Nov. 19. The Selectmen agreed to the date Monday night during a long discussion with members of the Housing Authority concerning the precise plan to be acted upon at that time.

Public school enrollment climbed to 3,871 Monday, with the opening of the Henry C. Sanborn School on Lovejoy Road. A total of 398 pupils entered the new school Monday morning—18 over the estimated population of the school. Central School continues to house the largest number of elementary grade pupils, with 605. And the South School has 492 students enrolled.



25 Years Ago—Sept. 10, 1987

Photographer Arno Minkkinen, native of Finland, was one of two town residents to be named finalist in the 1987 Massachusetts Artists Fellowship Program. Karl Baden, a Phillips Academy instructor, was also honored.

Thirty-eight Andover teachers found out what it’s like to be on the other side of the classroom this summer when they participated in computer workshops at Doherty Junior High School. Last week the teachers were finishing courses on using the new computer equipment Andover schools just bought. Doherty and West junior high schools each has 33 new Apple computers and Andover’s four elementary schools have 160.

Public comments made by George Danneman, of Jenkins Road, before he was appointed to the Andover Housing Partnership Committee earned him his walking papers from that committee last week. In transcripts and minutes released Tuesday night, Danneman is quoted as making statements that could be construed as anti-affordable housing. These statements, Town Manager Kenneth Mahoney feels, are in direct contrast to the town’s proactive policy on affordable housing.