Phillips Academy names new leader

courtesy photoDr. Raynard S. Kington

Phillips Academy has named Dr. Raynard S. Kington as its new leader.

Phillips announced last week that Kington, president of Grinnell College in central Iowa, will become the Andover academy's 16th head of school.

Kington will take over at Phillips next summer, succeeding John G. Palfrey who stepped down last summer to become president of the MacArthur Foundation.

“I am incredibly honored to be selected as head of such a historic institution," Kington said. "Non sibi (Latin for 'not for self, but for country') is an ideal that aligns with the values that I learned growing up, and it resonates with me at a deep level, both personally and professionally.

"Much like Grinnell College, Andover has a robust legacy of both academic excellence and diversity," Kington said. "I am looking forward to joining the Andover community and continuing the work of providing an exceptional education for extraordinary young people who will become meaningful contributors to the common good."

Kington will follow Jim Ventre, interim head of school at Phillips who will continue in that capacity through the transition in the summer of 2020. Once the transition is complete, Ventre, a member of the Phillips Class of 1979, will return to his role as assistant head of school for admissions and financial aid.

The announcement of Kington taking over was made last Thursday by Amy Falls, who is a member of the Phillips class of 1982, president-elect of the school's Board of Trustees and chair of the search committee; and Peter L.S. Currie, a member of the class of 1974 and president of the Board of Trustees.

The board voted unanimously in favor of Kington’s appointment, the announcement said.

Kington, who has served as president of Grinnell since 2010, said he is familiar with the East Coast. He grew up in Baltimore and has a brother who is a middle school teacher in Dorchester, whom he often visits.

He said he decided to accept the job at Phillips as a way to challenge himself, and also because of Andover's rich history, legacy of excellence and a "real commitment to responding to a changing world I found very appealing."

"Many private schools are struggling to create more diversity and inclusion, and Andover is really far down that road," Kington said. "I'll come here with an open mind and learn as much as I can. You can't know a place until you are there, and I will inevitably stumble."

As president of Grinnell, Kington regularly interacts with student government leadership to nurture a regular flow of communication. He said he expects to do the same in Andover.

Prior to Grinnell, Kington held multiple positions at the National Institutes of Health, including principal deputy director and acting director. Prior to working at the National Institutes of Health, he was a division director at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a senior scientist at RAND.

He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, where he serves on the governing council. He also serves on the Board of Directors of the American Council on Education.

Kington attended the University of Michigan, where he received a bachelor of science degree with distinction at age 19 and his M.D. at age 21. He went on to receive board certifications in internal medicine, public health as well as preventative and geriatric medicine, according to his biography on the Grinnell College website.

He received his master's degree in business administration with distinction and his Ph.D. with a concentration in health policy and economics from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. His research has focused on social determinants of health and on diversity in the scientific workforce.

Kington currently lives on the Grinnell campus with his husband, Peter T. Daniolos, M.D., a professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Iowa School of Medicine. They have two sons, ages 13 and 10.

 

 

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